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What kind of fruit are you? Are you an apple, pear, or maybe a banana? Eating an apple may be good for you, but looking like an apple is not. Researchers reported in last Wednesday’s Journal of the American Medical Association that 54 percent of U.S. adults have abdominal obesity, up from 46 percent in 1999-2000. Abdominal obesity is defined as a waistline of more than 35 inches in women and more than 40 inches in men.

Belly fat not only makes people look apple-shaped, but often means fat has built up deep inside the body, around the liver and other abdominal organs. According to a recent report, obesity is holding steady, but our waistlines are getting dangerously bigger. Those whose fat has settled mostly around their waistlines instead of in their hips, thighs, buttocks, or all over, are known to run a higher risk of heart disease, diabetes, and other obesity-related ailments. 

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Kathy Pride, RHIT, CPC, CCS-P, CPMA

Kathy is a proven leader in healthcare revenue cycle management with extensive experience in management, project implementation, coding, billing, physician documentation improvement, compliance audits, and education. She has trained and managed Health Information Management (HIM) professionals in multiple environments. She is currently the Senior Vice President of Coding and Documentation Services for Panacea Healthcare Solutions. Kathy has provided compliance auditing and documentation education to hundreds of physicians and coders throughout her career.

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